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Books  >   >   >  Comic
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Comic

Comic books have always been providing endless fun for millions of readers worldwide, including Singaporeans. Comic books remain popular today because of their compelling storylines and realistic drawings. However, comic books do not only bring pleasure, they can also impart life lessons in their own unique and exaggerated way. Read more about comic books below.

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Classics and Comics
S$ 35.10
Goguru

Since at least 1939, when daily-strip caveman Alley Oop time-traveled to the Trojan War, comics have been drawing (on) material from Greek and Roman myth, literature and history. At times the connection is cosmetic-as perhaps with Wonder Womans Amazonian heritage-and at times it is almost irrelevant-as with Hercules starfaring adventures in the 1982 Marvel miniseries. But all of these make implicit or explicit claims about the place of classics in modern literary culture. Classics and Comics is the first book to explore the engagement of classics with the epitome of modern popular literature, the comic book. This volume collects sixteen articles, all specially commissioned for this volume, that look at how classical content is deployed in comics and reconfigured for a modern audience. It opens with a detailed historical introduction surveying the role of classical material in comics since the 1930s. Subsequent chapters cover a broad range of topics, including the incorporation of modern theories of myth into the creation and interpretation of comic books, the appropriation of characters from classical literature and myth, and the reconfiguration of motif into a modern literary medium. Among the well-known comics considered in the collection are Frank Millers 300 and Sin City, DC Comics Wonder Woman, Jack Kirbys The Eternals, Neil Gaimans Sandman, and examples of Japanese manga. The volume also includes an original 12-page comics-essay, drawn and written by Eisner Award-winning Eric Shanower, creator of the graphic novel series Age of Bronze.

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Classics and Comics
S$ 35.10
Goguru

Since at least 1939, when daily-strip caveman Alley Oop time-traveled to the Trojan War, comics have been drawing (on) material from Greek and Roman myth, literature and history. At times the connection is cosmetic-as perhaps with Wonder Womans Amazonian heritage-and at times it is almost irrelevant-as with Hercules starfaring adventures in the 1982 Marvel miniseries. But all of these make implicit or explicit claims about the place of classics in modern literary culture. Classics and Comics is the first book to explore the engagement of classics with the epitome of modern popular literature, the comic book. This volume collects sixteen articles, all specially commissioned for this volume, that look at how classical content is deployed in comics and reconfigured for a modern audience. It opens with a detailed historical introduction surveying the role of classical material in comics since the 1930s. Subsequent chapters cover a broad range of topics, including the incorporation of modern theories of myth into the creation and interpretation of comic books, the appropriation of characters from classical literature and myth, and the reconfiguration of motif into a modern literary medium. Among the well-known comics considered in the collection are Frank Millers 300 and Sin City, DC Comics Wonder Woman, Jack Kirbys The Eternals, Neil Gaimans Sandman, and examples of Japanese manga. The volume also includes an original 12-page comics-essay, drawn and written by Eisner Award-winning Eric Shanower, creator of the graphic novel series Age of Bronze.

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Asian Comics
S$ 55.70
Goguru

Grand in its scope, Asian Comics dispels the myth that, outside of Japan, the continent is nearly devoid of comic strips and comic books. Relying on his fifty years of Asian mass communication and comic art research, during which he traveled to Asia at least seventy-eight times and visited many studios and workplaces, John A. Lent shows that nearly every country had a golden age of cartooning and has experienced a recent rejuvenation of the art form.As only Japanese comics output has received close and by now voluminous scrutiny, Asian Comics tells the story of the major comics creators outside of Japan. Lent covers the nations and regions of Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.Organized by regions of East, Southeast, and South Asia, Asian Comics provides 178 black-and-white illustrations and detailed information on comics of sixteen countries and regionstheir histories, key creators, characters, contemporary status, problems, trends, and issues. One chapter harkens back to predecessors of comics in Asia, describing scrolls, paintings, books, and puppetry with humorous tinges, primarily in China, India, Indonesia, and Japan. The first overview of Asian comic books and magazines (both mainstream and alternative), graphic novels, newspaper comic strips and gag panels, plus cartoon/humor magazines, Asian Comics brims with facts, fascinating anecdotes, and interview quotes from many pioneering masters, as well as younger artists.

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British Comics
S$ 42.80
Goguru

In this entertaining cultural history of British comic papers and magazines, James Chapman shows how comics were transformed in the early twentieth century from adult amusement to imaginative reading matter for children. Beginning with the first British comic, Ally Sloper-known as "e;A Selection, Side-splitting, Sentimental, and Serious, for the Benefit of Old Boys, Young Boys, Odd Boys generally, and even Girls"e;-British Comics goes on to describe the heyday of comics in the 1950s and '60s, when titles such as School Friend and Eagle sold a million copies a week. Chapman also analyzes the major genres, including schoolgirl fantasies and sports and war stories for boys; the development of a new breed of violent comics in the 1970s, including the controversial Action and 2000AD; and the attempt by American publisher, Marvel, to launch a new hero for the British market in the form of Captain Britain. Considering the work of important contemporary comic writers such as Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Ian Edginton, Warren Ellis, and Garth Ennis, Chapman's history comes right up to the present and takes in adult-oriented comics such as Warrior, Crisis, Deadline,and Revolver, and alternative comics such as Viz. Through a look at the changing structure of the comic publishing industry and how comic publishers, writers, and artists have responded to the tastes of their consumers, Chapman ultimately argues that British comics are distinctive and different from American, French, and Japanese comics. An invaluable reference for all comic collectors and fans in Britain and beyond, British Comics showcases the major role comics have played in the imaginative lives of readers young and old.

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Comics and Conflict
S$ 54.10
Goguru

Illustration has been an integral part of human history. Particularly before the advent of media such as photography, film, television, and now the Internet, illustrations in all their variety had been the primary visual way to convey history. The comic book, which emerged in its modern form in the 1930s, was another form of visual entertainment that gave readers, especially children, a form of escape.As World War II began, however, comic books became a part of propaganda as well, providing information and education for both children and adults. This book looks at how specific comic books of the war genre have been used to display patriotism, adventure through war stories, and eventually to tell of the horrors of combatfrom World War II through the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan in the first decade of the twenty-first century.This book also examines how war- and patriotically-themed comics evolved from soldier-drawn reflections of society, eventually developing along with the broader comic book medium into a mirror of American society during times of conflict. These comic books generally reflected patriotic fervor, but sometimes they advanced a specific cause. As war comic books evolved along with American society, many also served as a form of protest against United States foreign and military policy. During the countrys most recent wars, however, patriotism has made a comeback, at the same time that the grim realities of combat are depicted more realistically than ever before.The focus of the book is not only on the development of the comic book medium, but also as a bell-weather of society at the same time. How did they approach the news of the war? Were people in favor or against the fighting? Did the writers of comics promote a perception of combat or did they try to convey the horrors of war? All of these questions were important to the research, and serve as a focal point for what has been researched only in limited form previously.The conclusions of the book show that comic books are more than mere forms of entertainment. Comic books were also a way of political protest against war, or what the writers felt were wider examples of governmental abuse. In the post 9/11 era, the comic books have returned to their propagandistic/patriotic roots.

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Comics and Language
S$ 55.00
Goguru

It has become an axiom in comic studies that "e;comics is a language, not a genre."e; But what exactly does that mean, and how is discourse on the form both aided and hindered by thinking of it in linguistic terms? In Comics and Language, Hannah Miodrag challenges many of the key assumptions about the "e;grammar"e; and formal characteristics of comics, and offers a more nuanced, theoretical framework that she argues will better serve the field by offering a consistent means for communicating critical theory in the scholarship. Through engaging close readings and an accessible use of theory, this book exposes the problems embedded in the ways critics have used ideas of language, literature, structuralism, and semiotics, and sets out a new and more theoretically sound way of understanding how comics communicate. Comics and Language argues against the critical tendency to flatten the distinctions between language and images and to discuss literature purely in terms of story content. It closely examines the original critical theories that such arguments purport to draw on and shows how they in fact point away from the conclusions they are commonly used to prove. The book improves the use the field makes of existing scholarly disciplines and furthers the ongoing sophistication of the field. It provides animated and insightful analyses of a range of different texts and takes an interdisciplinary approach. Comics and Language will appeal to the general comics reader and will prove crucial for specialized scholars in the fields of comics, literature, cultural studies, art history, and visual studies. It also provides a valuable summary of the current state of formalist criticism within comics studies and so presents the ideal text for those interested in exploring this growing area of research

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Asian Comics
S$ 55.70
Goguru

Grand in its scope, Asian Comics dispels the myth that, outside of Japan, the continent is nearly devoid of comic strips and comic books. Relying on his fifty years of Asian mass communication and comic art research, during which he traveled to Asia at least seventy-eight times and visited many studios and workplaces, John A. Lent shows that nearly every country had a golden age of cartooning and has experienced a recent rejuvenation of the art form.As only Japanese comics output has received close and by now voluminous scrutiny, Asian Comics tells the story of the major comics creators outside of Japan. Lent covers the nations and regions of Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.Organized by regions of East, Southeast, and South Asia, Asian Comics provides 178 black-and-white illustrations and detailed information on comics of sixteen countries and regionstheir histories, key creators, characters, contemporary status, problems, trends, and issues. One chapter harkens back to predecessors of comics in Asia, describing scrolls, paintings, books, and puppetry with humorous tinges, primarily in China, India, Indonesia, and Japan. The first overview of Asian comic books and magazines (both mainstream and alternative), graphic novels, newspaper comic strips and gag panels, plus cartoon/humor magazines, Asian Comics brims with facts, fascinating anecdotes, and interview quotes from many pioneering masters, as well as younger artists.

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Openness of Comics
S$ 62.10
Goguru

Never before have comics seemed so popular or diversified, proliferating across a broad spectrum of genres, experimenting with a variety of techniques, and gaining recognition as a legitimate, rich form of art. Maaheen Ahmed examines this trend by taking up philosopher Umberto Ecos notion of the open work of art, whereby the readeror listener or viewer, as the case may beis offered several possibilities of interpretation in a cohesive narrative and aesthetic structure. Ahmed delineates the visual, literary, and other medium-specific features used by comics to form open rather than closed works, methods by which comics generate or limit meaning as well as increase and structure the scope of reading into a work.Ahmed analyzes a diverse group of British, American, and European (Franco-Belgian, German, Finnish) comics. She treats examples from the key genre categories of fictionalized memoirs and biographies, adventure and superhero, noir, black comedy and crime, science fiction and fantasy. Her analyses demonstrate the ways in which comics generate openness by concentrating on the gaps essential to the very medium of comics, the range of meaning ensconced within words and images as well as their interaction with each other.The analyzed comics, extending from famous to lesser known works, include Will Eisners The Contract with God Trilogy, Jacques Tardis It Was the War of the Trenches, Hugo Pratts The Ballad of the Salty Sea, Edmond Baudoins The Voyage, Grant Morrison and Dave McKeans Arkham Asylum, Neil Gaimans Sandman series, Alan Moore and Eddie Campbells From Hell, Moebiuss Arzach, Yslaires Cloud 99 series, and Jarmo Mkils Taxi Ride to Van Goghs Ear.

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Comics of Herge
S$ 62.10
Goguru

As the creator of Tintin, Herg (19071983) remains one of the most important and influential figures in the history of comics. When Herg, born Georges Prosper Remi in Belgium, emerged from the controversy surrounding his actions after World War II, his most famous work leapt to international fame and set the standard for European comics. While his style popularized what became known as the clear line in cartooning, this edited volume shows how his life and art turned out much more complicated than his method.The book opens with Hergs aesthetic techniques, including analyses of his efforts to comprehend and represent absence and the rhythm of mundaneness between panels of action. Broad views of his career describe how Herg navigated changing ideas of air travel, while precise accounts of his life during Nazi occupation explain how the demands of the occupied press transformed his understanding of what a comics page could do. The next section considers a subject with which Herg was himself consumed: the fraught lines between high and low art. By reading the late masterpieces of the Tintin series, these chapters situate his artistic legacy. A final section considers how the clear line style has been reinterpreted around the world, from contemporary Francophone writers to a Chinese American cartoonist and on to Turkey, where Tintin has been reinvented into something meaningful to an audience Herg probably never anticipated.Despite the attention already devoted to Herg, no multi-author critical treatment of his work exists in English, the majority of the scholarship being in French. With contributors from five continents drawing on a variety of critical methods, this volumes range will shape the study of Herg for many years to come.

Read more
Go to Shop
Comics and Language
S$ 55.00
Goguru

It has become an axiom in comic studies that "e;comics is a language, not a genre."e; But what exactly does that mean, and how is discourse on the form both aided and hindered by thinking of it in linguistic terms? In Comics and Language, Hannah Miodrag challenges many of the key assumptions about the "e;grammar"e; and formal characteristics of comics, and offers a more nuanced, theoretical framework that she argues will better serve the field by offering a consistent means for communicating critical theory in the scholarship. Through engaging close readings and an accessible use of theory, this book exposes the problems embedded in the ways critics have used ideas of language, literature, structuralism, and semiotics, and sets out a new and more theoretically sound way of understanding how comics communicate. Comics and Language argues against the critical tendency to flatten the distinctions between language and images and to discuss literature purely in terms of story content. It closely examines the original critical theories that such arguments purport to draw on and shows how they in fact point away from the conclusions they are commonly used to prove. The book improves the use the field makes of existing scholarly disciplines and furthers the ongoing sophistication of the field. It provides animated and insightful analyses of a range of different texts and takes an interdisciplinary approach. Comics and Language will appeal to the general comics reader and will prove crucial for specialized scholars in the fields of comics, literature, cultural studies, art history, and visual studies. It also provides a valuable summary of the current state of formalist criticism within comics studies and so presents the ideal text for those interested in exploring this growing area of research

Read more
Go to Shop
Comics of Herge
S$ 62.10
Goguru

As the creator of Tintin, Herg (19071983) remains one of the most important and influential figures in the history of comics. When Herg, born Georges Prosper Remi in Belgium, emerged from the controversy surrounding his actions after World War II, his most famous work leapt to international fame and set the standard for European comics. While his style popularized what became known as the clear line in cartooning, this edited volume shows how his life and art turned out much more complicated than his method.The book opens with Hergs aesthetic techniques, including analyses of his efforts to comprehend and represent absence and the rhythm of mundaneness between panels of action. Broad views of his career describe how Herg navigated changing ideas of air travel, while precise accounts of his life during Nazi occupation explain how the demands of the occupied press transformed his understanding of what a comics page could do. The next section considers a subject with which Herg was himself consumed: the fraught lines between high and low art. By reading the late masterpieces of the Tintin series, these chapters situate his artistic legacy. A final section considers how the clear line style has been reinterpreted around the world, from contemporary Francophone writers to a Chinese American cartoonist and on to Turkey, where Tintin has been reinvented into something meaningful to an audience Herg probably never anticipated.Despite the attention already devoted to Herg, no multi-author critical treatment of his work exists in English, the majority of the scholarship being in French. With contributors from five continents drawing on a variety of critical methods, this volumes range will shape the study of Herg for many years to come.

Read more
Go to Shop
Openness of Comics
S$ 62.10
Goguru

Never before have comics seemed so popular or diversified, proliferating across a broad spectrum of genres, experimenting with a variety of techniques, and gaining recognition as a legitimate, rich form of art. Maaheen Ahmed examines this trend by taking up philosopher Umberto Ecos notion of the open work of art, whereby the readeror listener or viewer, as the case may beis offered several possibilities of interpretation in a cohesive narrative and aesthetic structure. Ahmed delineates the visual, literary, and other medium-specific features used by comics to form open rather than closed works, methods by which comics generate or limit meaning as well as increase and structure the scope of reading into a work.Ahmed analyzes a diverse group of British, American, and European (Franco-Belgian, German, Finnish) comics. She treats examples from the key genre categories of fictionalized memoirs and biographies, adventure and superhero, noir, black comedy and crime, science fiction and fantasy. Her analyses demonstrate the ways in which comics generate openness by concentrating on the gaps essential to the very medium of comics, the range of meaning ensconced within words and images as well as their interaction with each other.The analyzed comics, extending from famous to lesser known works, include Will Eisners The Contract with God Trilogy, Jacques Tardis It Was the War of the Trenches, Hugo Pratts The Ballad of the Salty Sea, Edmond Baudoins The Voyage, Grant Morrison and Dave McKeans Arkham Asylum, Neil Gaimans Sandman series, Alan Moore and Eddie Campbells From Hell, Moebiuss Arzach, Yslaires Cloud 99 series, and Jarmo Mkils Taxi Ride to Van Goghs Ear.

Read more

Top Comic Price List 2018

Top 10 products Price Store
Comica Buffy The Vampire Slayer - Season 9 Volume 1 (BK2001) S$ 30.00 Lazada
Comic Book History of Comics S$ 15.80 Goguru
Art of Comics S$ 35.20 Goguru
It Happens at Comic-Con S$ 29.40 Goguru
Classics and Comics S$ 35.10 Goguru
Image Comics Monstress Volume 1: Awakening S$ 32.70 Lazada
Comic Collection S$ 13.90 Goguru
Atomic Comics S$ 45.40 Goguru
Classics and Comics S$ 35.10 Goguru
Asian Comics S$ 55.70 Goguru

3 Important Life Lessons that Comic Books Teach Us

Comic books are a source of entertainment and escape for readers worldwide. They have survived through technological advancements and are still popular today amongst Singaporeans. The vast array of characters, absurd superpowers and abilities, and somewhat over-the-top storylines never fails to keep readers intrigued to know what happens next. Comic books also serve as a temporary stress reliever, allowing one to temporarily forget his worldly troubles and indulge in a fantasy realm. All these leads to a common perspective that comic books are meant only for pleasure reading as they do not contain lessons that one can learn from. However, comic books can teach their readers important values, albeit in unorthodox and elaborate ways.

1. Making the Most of What You Have

One important lesson that people today can learn from is to be resourceful and appreciative of what we have. Most of us live comfortably, with warm homes, readily available food, and access to modern technology, yet we often complain and whine about not having enough. While we are enjoying these luxuries, we forget about the people living in Third World countries who are lacking even basic life necessities. This lesson can be learned from Lex Luthor, the wealthy DC villain, and Superman’s scourge. His resourcefulness when his wealth was taken away from him was admirable. When Luthor was imprisoned in the Silver Age, he had to use only basic resources – some tin cans, the tungsten from a light bulb, a coil spring, and a flashlight to create a time machine. Having lived a luxurious life, it would have been incredibly difficult for him to adapt but he did not even sulk or complain, instead he made the most of what he had at the time.

2. The Importance of Teamwork

Comics such as the Justice League and X-Men series also remind us that no matter how able you are as an individual, everyone has a role to play in a team. Our favourite superheroes and comic characters often show excellent teamwork because they acknowledge each other’s strengths and weaknesses and work together in a team. Even the godlike Superman has his weakness, which is why he needs to rely on his Justice League teammates to assist him (and occasionally save him) and protect humankind. Working in a team enables you to reduce your own weaknesses and embrace the strengths of others. No one is perfect and no one should be underestimated as well.

3. With Power Comes Responsibility

Today, power is one of the biggest assets that many individuals crave for. The typical mindset is more power you have, the more influential you are, the more you can control things to go according to your will. However, power should not be used on one’s whim and fancy. Instead, as Peter Parker’s Uncle Ben puts it, “with great power comes great responsibility”. It is a notion that should be taught in the real world. People that are influential and in a position of power should use their authority, resources, and wealth to change the world positively – helping the less fortunate, and support environmental efforts, and promoting peace.

Widen Your Knowledge and Imagination with Books

Books are reliable sources of information that helps to increase your knowledge and exercise your creativity. History books enable readers to understand the development of humankind so that past mistakes are not repeated, whereas art books help to inspire one to think outside the box.